Poll indicates Greeks' lack of faith in politicians, parties

Greeks distrust the country?s politicians and political parties and are increasingly pessimistic regarding both the country?s and their own financial future, according to a latest opinion poll conducted by Public Issue on behalf of Skai and Kathimerini.

According to the survey, Prime Minister and New Democracy leader Antonis Samaras is still favored for the role of premier, against SYRIZA chief Alexis Tsipras.

A three-party coalition government comprising New Democracy, PASOK and Democratic Left, is still ahead of a potential SYRIZA administration. The opinion poll was conducted during the November 1-5 period.

Antonis Samaras garnered 37 percent of the vote of those questioned, against 31 percent earned by Alexis Tsipras, while 27 percent responded that neither party leaders should lead the country.

At the same time, the ND-PASOK-Democratic Left coalition was favored by 32 percent of respondents, while 24 percent favored the possibility of SYRIZA rising to power. Those who favored neither reached 39 percent.

Meanwhile, 59 percent of those questioned believed that the SYRIZA coalition would prevail in the case of snap elections, compared to 26 percent who saw New Democracy as the winner.

The vast majority of those questioned (76 percent) believed that the three-party coalition will not last its four-year-mandate.

SYRIZA was voted as the most popular opposition party (33 percecnt) irrespective of respondents' party preferences, trailed by Independent Greeks (16 percent) and far-right Golden Dawn (14 percent).

The need for the country to proceed with a series of privatizations was reflected in the answers of 62 percent of those questioned, with 33 percent stating that they did not believe these were necessary.

Not a single politician went over the 50 percent mark in terms of popularity: Democratic Left leader Fotis Kouvelis earned 49 percent, followed by Alexis Tsipras (42 percent) and Antonis Samaras (38 percent).

According to the survey, 81 percent of those questioned said they were disappointed with the way democracy operated in the country, 11 percent stated their satisfaction, while 8 percent felt that democratic rules had been abolished altogether.

Only 5 percent of respondents expected their own financial situation to improve, while 75 percent believed that things will get worse.