Wednesday November 26, 2014 Search
Weather | Athens
13o C
8o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
Emerging market storm boon for eurozone's periphery

A reversal in fortunes between southern Europe and once-booming developing economies has triggered a substantial allocation shift by global funds out of emerging assets and into the euro markets they fled two years ago.

Escalating violence in Ukraine and the suspension of Nigeria's central bank governor hit emerging market assets on Thursday, even as Spain, once seen as the focus of the euro zone debt crisis, saw its long-term borrowing costs tumble to their lowest since 2008.

"Probably towards the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 we've seen flows out of emerging markets and into the peripheral euro zone," said Peter Wilson, managing director of First International Advisors, a subsidiary of Wells Fargo.
Wilson's fund is overweight Spanish and Italian government bonds and recently added to longer-dated debt, convinced that yields are adequate to compensate for the risks.

The five countries on the eurozone's periphery - Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal and Ireland - are expected to record economic growth this year, ending years of recession and capital flight triggered by fears over their huge debts.

Ireland, bailed out by international lenders in 2012, is expected to grow more than 2 percent this year, comparable to rates expected in Russia, Brazil or Turkey.

Changes in emerging markets (EM) are no less startling.

Growth is slowing, currencies have weakened, and bond yields have risen. In a key gauge of sentiment, some countries, including Russia and Romania, have been forced to cancel bond auctions or pay higher yields to lure investors.
Lines between emerging and developed markets blurred during the crises that hit first the United States and then the eurozone since 2008.

But many of the investors who shifted into emerging markets at the time have returned, and have lately beaten a path to peripheral eurozone markets. Many were northern European investors seeking the relative stability of eurozone markets.
Funds dedicated to bonds and stocks from Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain, have taken in over $12 billion in net terms since Jan 2013, according to data from consultancy EPFR Global, which is estimated to capture around 15 percent of global flows.

At least some of this will have come from emerging funds which according to EPFR, shed over $50 billion in this time.
Sandra Holdsworth, investment manager at Kames Capital, said she took advantage of the wobble triggered by the emerging markets sell-off to add to longer-dated Italian and Spanish debt. Her fund has been overweight Italian and Spanish bonds since the beginning of the year.

Seeking yield

Data from Citi shows net demand for lower-rated eurozone bonds increased three-fold last month compared to preceding months, dominated by longterm investors such as pension funds.

"This is consistent with a flight to relative quality triggered by the EM crisis reinforcing the already strong yield-seeking dynamic within Europe," Citi strategists said in a note.

Pioneer Investments was overweight emerging stocks and bonds for three years but cut exposure last year. From late-2013, the asset manager loaded up on European stocks, including from Spain and Italy, said Monica Defend, Pioneer's head of asset allocation research.

Emerging stocks have fallen 5 percent this year while bond returns are flat to negative. Greek, Portuguese, Irish and Italian stocks on the other hand are up 5 to 10 percent this year though Spain's IBEX index has barely gained due to its big exposure to a slowing Latin America.

Returns on eurozone debt have been boosted by sharp falls in yields. Irish and Portuguese yields stand more than 10 percentage points below 2011 record highs. Spanish debt returns have sparkled, topping 5 percent this year.

Both Italy and Spain's borrowing costs are at their lowest in eight years, half levels hit at the height of the euro zone debt crisis in early 2012.

Investors see further gains, encouraged by an improved growth outlook in the currency bloc and due to expectations the European Central Bank will keep monetary policy ultra-easy for an extended period.

"Italian and Spanish government bond yields have admittedly declined sharply over the past year, but you still get a yield pick-up of 200 basis points relative to (German) Bunds," said Nikolaos Panigirtzoglou, a global market strategist at JPMorgan.

"Given how much demand by non-domestic investors has strengthened since last summer, it is reasonable to expect further tightening this year towards a spread of 150 basis points versus Bunds."

[Reuters]

ekathimerini.com , Thursday February 20, 2014 (17:41)  
Debtors snap up offer for easier settlements
Belgium gas firm said to be eyeing DESFA
OLP approval paves way for investment in Piraeus
Airport tender exceeds expectations
Hundreds of migrants on crippled ship off Crete
Ships from Greece rushed to help after a crippled freighter crammed with hundreds of migrants floundered for hours Tuesday in gale-force winds and high waves in the Mediterranean Sea, offici...
Policemen suspected of working at Piraeus bar where shooting took place
At least three serving policemen are thought to have been working at the bar in Mikrolimano, Piraeus, where a 31-year-old man opened fire with an AK-47 early on Saturday, resulting in 15 peo...
Inside News
SOCCER
Atletico eyes last 16 berth against Olympiakos
Greek champion Olympiakos faces a tough task if it is to prevent last season's beaten finalist Atletico Madrid sealing its passage into the last 16 of the Champions League at the Vicente Cal...
SOCCER
EPO ends soccer suspension, Super League resumes
Soccer action will resume this weekend after the Super League convened on Monday, elected a new president and alternate president and sent a letter to the soccer federation that assures it t...
Inside Sports
COMMENTARY
Beware of the fallen idols
Akis Tsochatzopoulos, a legendary figure of the Greek socialist movement, a man who came very close to taking over the party that governed the country for half of the time following the fall...
EDITORIAL
The hard truth
The coalition government must tell the truth to the Greek people, even if this entails admitting to mistakes made over the last few months. The countrys citizens are fully aware of how cruc...
Inside Comment
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
RECENT NEWS
1. Hundreds of migrants on crippled ship off Crete
2. Atletico eyes last 16 berth against Olympiakos
3. Debtors snap up offer for easier settlements
4. Belgium gas firm said to be eyeing DESFA
5. OLP approval paves way for investment in Piraeus
6. Airport tender exceeds expectations
more news
Today
This Week
1. Anastasiades to undergo heart surgery in the US on Dec 4
2. Cargo vessel carrying hundreds of migrants adrift southeast of Crete
3. Trade deficit widens by 8.7 percent during Jan-Sept period, says ELSTAT report
4. Two police officers among 9 arrested for drug trafficking
5. Fraport, Copelouzos offer highest bid for Greek regional airports
6. Stop Mediterranean becoming vast migrant cemetery, Pope tells Europe
Today
This Week
1. Double quake on Atalanti fault line rattles Greek capital [Update]
2. Biden heads to Istanbul amid tension over Cyprus EEZ violation
3. Give Greece a chance
4. Every age has its collaborators
5. Carlsberg takes control of Greek brewer Olympic Brewery [Update]
6. Scientists expand excavation of ancient Amphipolis
Find us ...
... on
Twitter
... on Facebook
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright 2014, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.