Sunday May 24, 2015 Search
Weather | Athens
14o C
09o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
France's Moscovici optimistic on Greece

By Alexia Kefala

There is speculation in Paris that Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici may abandon his post to become a “super commissioner” in Brussels. In an interview with Kathimerini, ahead of a visit to Greece, Moscovici says that, in any case, he is keeping a close eye on developments regarding the Greek economy.

You are about to spend 48 hours in Athens to attend the Informal Meeting of Ministers for Economic and Financial Affairs (Ecofin) on April 1 and 2. What is your opinion about the state of Greece at the moment?

The considerable efforts made over the past few years have started to yield fruit. The year 2014 should mark the return to growth: Experts predict 0.6 percent economic growth [for 2014] and 2.9 percent for 2015.
Public finances are improving. I see the return of a positive momentum as well as future prospects that will encourage investment and create employment opportunities. Greece deserves as much. We must consolidate these good results while continuing the effort to reduce unemployment.

Yes, but you recently said that Greece must intensify its efforts.

We must speak the truth. [The country] has made a considerable effort, but it is not yet out of the woods. Europe is on the side of the Greek people in this trial. The reforms proposed in this fourth review are necessary because they contain measures regarding purchasing power. The reform of public administration – for which France provided technical aid – is equally important so that Greeks can create a more effective and less costly public service.

Do you think the country is going to need a third aid package? Is a restructuring in the cards?

There has been considerable improvement in Greece’s borrowing terms and this is a positive development. So far there has been no decision and our aim, both at the Eurogroup and the International Monetary Fund, is the same: to meet Greece’s fiscal needs to the extent that the country cannot meet them, offering a lower interest rate and do what needs to be done so that the country can regain its autonomy.

Is there a future for the troika today? If so, what will it look like?

We should have no delusions: Things are not hard because of the troika. They are [hard] because of the crisis whose brutality and intensity are unprecedented.
At the same time we had to deal with the huge deficits in public finances and competitiveness at a time when the eurozone was introducing new instruments to deal with worst-case scenarios. In this context, the international community made every possible effort to make sure that reforms would allow the fulfillment of commitments undertaken by Greece and everyone is aware of the efforts that have been made.
The IMF offered its experience on macroeconomic programs, the Commission provided the know-how on the European economy, the European Central Bank [provided] economic expertise on the eurozone. Being able to complement each other has been very useful, I believe.
There was urgency, but it is important to think long-term. We need a more effective safety net to protect the most vulnerable sections of the population. We must also step up reforms on purchasing power. Finally, there must be more transparency in the way states deal with reforms that are supported by the Eurogroup. This is the framework in which we must tread.

What will be your response should you be nominated for super commissioner in a future Commission?

I will make no comment on ongoing speculation about my candidacy. Jokes aside, my position has been steady for the past two years. We must steadily go after the best possible cooperation and support growth and employment, managing our public finances in the best possible manner.
 

ekathimerini.com , Saturday March 29, 2014 (17:48)  
Hotel contracts with a ‘Greek default clause’
Listed firms have whisked away most of their cash reserves
Car sales drop a gear on VAT rate uncertainty
Bulk of loan requests comes from food service
Protesters torch trolley bus, clash with police in Athens
Around 40 hooded anti-establishment protesters threw petrol bombs and stones at riot police in central Athens on Saturday, setting fire to a trolley bus. Police fired teargas to try and cont...
Tsipras faces down radicals within SYRIZA over terms of deal
After a busy week of talks with European leaders aimed at securing support for a deal for Greece, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras faces challenges on the home front amid tensions with SYRIZA o...
Inside News
SOCCER
Reds add Cup to league trophy with 3-1 win over Xanthi
Olympiakos completed a league-and-cup double on Saturday by beating Xanthi 3-1 in the Greek Cup final at the Olympic Stadium of Athens, that was more balanced than the final score suggests. ...
BASKETBALL
Olympiakos strolls past Korivos Amaliadas
Olympiakos completed the Basket League’s semifinal line-up on Saturday after sweeping Korivos Amaliadas with a 2-0 score in the best-of-three quarterfinals. After winning 91-52 in Game 1 at ...
Inside Sports
ANALYSIS
Neither Grexit nor a dual currency will solve Greece’s problems
A Grexit or the introduction of a dual currency is not a solution to Greece’s problems. On the contrary, it would be a worst-case scenario for Greece in the short term. Only in the medium to...
COMMENTARY
First aid for the capital
The fact that the center of Athens exudes the stench of human waste is an undeniable truth, just like the fact that in late spring, one nostril smells blossoming bitter lemon trees while the...
Inside Comment
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
 RECENT NEWS
1. Reds add Cup to league trophy with 3-1 win over Xanthi
2. Olympiakos strolls past Korivos Amaliadas
3. Protesters torch trolley bus, clash with police in Athens
4. Tsipras faces down radicals within SYRIZA over terms of deal
5. Police on standby after Roma dispute leaves one dead
6. Dog attacks seven people in Thessaloniki, including 13-year-old boy
more news
Today
This Week
1. Hotel contracts with a ‘Greek default clause’
2. Neither Grexit nor a dual currency will solve Greece’s problems
3. Listed firms have whisked away most of their cash reserves
4. First aid for the capital
5. Tsipras faces down radicals within SYRIZA over terms of deal
6. New civil service assessment scheme focuses on rewards instead of punishment
Today
This Week
1. The Greek-German breakthrough that didn’t come
2. Conspiracy madness
3. Greece came close to not paying IMF
4. National self-awareness put to the test
5. Albanian demarche raises concerns about possible territorial claims over Greece
6. Greek endgame nears for Tsipras as bank collateral hits buffers
   Find us ...
  ... on
Twitter
     ... on Facebook   
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright © 2015, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.