Sunday March 29, 2015 Search
Weather | Athens
14o C
09o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
Politicized archaeology

By Pantelis Boukalas

Let us suppose that archaeologists discover that the tomb uncovered in Amphipolis was not the resting place of Roxana or Nearchos, but of Alexander the Great. Let us assume, that is, that archaeologists (pushed by “national interests” promoted via frenetic media to work at a pace that may expose or even harm their science) bring to light the stuff that professional archaeologists and hundreds of amateurs have only dared to dream. What would this mean and what would be its repercussions beyond a few initial days of public fervor and a spike in tourism to the area? What effect would the discovery that Alexander was buried there have on a national level – not in terms of the economy (which will continue to be as dismal as it is today even if all the treasures of Persia are discovered there) – but in terms of how we view ourselves as a nation?

It is not hard to imagine the impact of such a discovery if we take a look at the existing evidence. It is a known fact that Greece has long been at odds with Israel over who can claim the lead in nationalized and politicized archaeology, often in a way that is an affront to the scientific community. Let us take the findings of excavations in northern Greece, for example, constantly cited to suit political circumstances and often acting as ambassadors of national policy: The findings and their interpretation are used to prove the primal Greekness of the Macedonians and once and for all silence our unmentionable neighbors to the north who, surrendered to their own obsessive national policy, are seeking control over parts if not all of our Macedonian heritage.

Now, the ancient relics of Amphipolis are once more being linked to the name dispute and being used for petty political interests. They are being presented by the state and by many representatives of the media as the final confirmation of Macedonia’s Greekness, even though as a country we have staunchly supported this fact for the past 20 years. We have also heard it said that the findings at the tomb have steeled the morale of disheartened Greeks. First of all, with so many surpluses about, surely the Greeks are no longer disheartened. And second, if our morale has sunk to such a low (despite the Parthenon, Olympia, Delphi, Knossos and Vergina) that it needs a tomb to be revived, then there is much more we need to be worried about.

We have also heard that the discoveries at Amphipolis are contributing to the improvement of Greece’s international image – ergo, they may boost tourism. If the government really had such a high regard of archaeology, then why is it cutting back funding to the extent of causing major operational problems at excavations, sites and museums?

ekathimerini.com , Tuesday September 2, 2014 (10:29)  
Let´s change the subject
Too little, too late?
Time to get moving
The same old story
Greece’s Tsipras to meet ministers as creditors ponder overhauls
Greece’s Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is to hold a cabinet meeting Sunday as Greek officials and creditors in Brussels discuss overhauls the country proposes to secure more funds from the e...
Moscow expects progress from Tsipras visit
Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’s planned visit to Moscow on April 8 will be a “big event” in the course of relations between Greece and Russia, according to the Russian ambassador in Athens, ...
Inside News
Greece says talks with lenders are continuing positively
Greece sounded an upbeat tone on Sunday over talks with its European and IMF creditors, which it said were continuing through the weekend as the cash-strapped country races to agree on refor...
Fitch downgrades Greece amid bailout uncertainty
Ratings agency Fitch has downgraded Greeces sovereign rating amid growing uncertainty over the new government's pledge to overhaul reforms needed to restart bailout loan payments and avoid d...
Inside Business
BASKETBALL
Greens live dangerously in Istanbul
Panathinaikos played with fire in Istanbul, but still managed to beat Galatasaray 86-84 on Friday and climb to the third sport of its group two games before the end of the Euroleague top-16....
SOCCER
Greek federation backs injured Holebas
The Greek soccer federation on Friday insisted that international defender Jose Holebas had been dropped from team training in Austria because of injury and not for any other reason. Media r...
Inside Sports
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
 RECENT NEWS
1. Greece’s Tsipras to meet ministers as creditors ponder overhauls
2. Greece says talks with lenders are continuing positively
3. Moscow expects progress from Tsipras visit
4. Another suspect eyed in prison breakout plan
5. Eurogroup unlikely to be held soon to discuss Greek reforms
6. Disabled convicts to be freed early
more news
Today
This Week
1. Eurogroup unlikely to be held soon to discuss Greek reforms
2. Moscow expects progress from Tsipras visit
3. Another suspect eyed in prison breakout plan
4. Greece’s Tsipras to meet ministers as creditors ponder overhauls
5. Greece says talks with lenders are continuing positively
6. Fitch downgrades Greece amid bailout uncertainty
Today
This Week
1. Next Monday is D-Day for state funds
2. PM faces Merkel amid race to detail reforms
3. Some more equal than others
4. Greece to present reforms by Monday, says gov't spokesman [Update]
5. Looking at the Chinese model
6. Greece optimistic on deal with euro area next week
   Find us ...
  ... on
Twitter
     ... on Facebook   
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright © 2015, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.