Thursday August 21, 2014 Search
Weather | Athens
32o C
25o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
The fine science of breaking the law, the democratic way

By Paschos Mandravelis

Even breaking the law sometimes requires a special touch, but during the years of the Left’s ideological hegemony, it was honed down to a science.

The recipe is simple: a group of people – usually representing specific interests – denounces a law that has been ratified in Parliament as being “unenforceable” and then simply refuses to abide by it.

In that rare event that the authorities do try to enforce legislation that aims to punish the offenders, leftist politicians will most likely whinge that the government is trying to “criminalize the struggle of the people” – meaning the struggle of a specific interest group.

If that group happens to enjoy media access it will most probably come up with a few elaborate articles regarding the constitutionality of the law that impinges upon its rights, call for “political disobedience” and finally invoke Article 120 of the Constitution, which entrusts its protection “against anyone that tries to breach it by force” to the patriotic sentiment of the Greek people.

To be sure, Greek constitutional lawmakers have factored in the possibility of a military coup, but in a country where concepts often lose their meaning, the voting of laws by a majority is easily denounced by some as a “coup” and every state decision is readily interpreted as “violence” – particularly in cases where certain groups lose their privileges.

The same scenario was played out recently by the country’s intellectual elite: university rectors. In a bid to rescue the clientelist system that installed them in power, they named themselves – together with that small group of students with political affiliations whose job it is to manipulate their peers into acting and voting in a particular way – the “academic community.” After that, they did everything in their power to sabotage elections for governing councils at the country’s universities. In the process, they turned a blind eye to the bullying suffered by professors who dared to take part in the vote.

When the vote eventually did take place, electronically and without the threat of raids, the high turnout rate (between 75 and 95 percent) exposed the skeptics who then began to question the very procedure. Once they made sufficient fools of themselves, their ideological stewards spoke out against what they labelled “techno-fascism.”

At the University of the Aegean a small group of politically-affiliated students (apparently the same people who recently covered university walls with intimidating posters against professors) broke down the door protecting the university’s computer equipment and, after threatening the staff, shut down the server.

As a result, the university was left without Internet and telephone access (that would perhaps make a more accurate definition of techno-fascism). And yet, if we are to believe officials of the SYRIZA party on the island of Lesvos “the cancellation of elections for the administrative councils of the University of the Aegean shows that the law cannot be implemented when it runs into the universal reaction of the academic community.”

But how can these veterans of the post-dictatorship era, better known here as the “metapolitefsi,” be so certain about the “universal reaction of the academic community” when the voter turnout was between 75 and 95 percent?

The biggest problem for SYRIZA is not the idiotic comments occasionally uttered by party officials. These can only challenged by means of democratic dialogue. The more fundamental problem is the dictatorial tactics with which it chooses to impose the will of a minority upon the majority. And if anyone were to point out that fascism is not defined by party colors but by the violation of popular will, they would be immediately denounced as “fascist.” They would then accused of equating right-wing with left-wing violence or, worse, of whitewashing the far-right Golden Dawn party, whose deputies find that they have the right and authority to check the personal information of immigrant vendors, while at the same time members of SYRIZA are busy democratically inspecting those of police officers.

ekathimerini.com , Thursday November 15, 2012 (20:44)  
Self-destructing political system
Welcome movement
Logged out of reality
Manipulated institutions
Avramopoulos in US for talks with Hagel on possible Greek role in peace missions
Defense Minister Dimitris Avramopoulos arrived in Washington early on Thursday for an official visit following an invitation by his US counterpart Chuck Hagel. The two men were to meet later...
Three held on Rhodes over human trafficking accusations
Three people have been arrested on Rhodes over human trafficking accusations after they allegedly forced three Roma children to beg on the island’s streets. The parents of the three children...
Inside News
Eurozone business growth slows in July, prices fall: PMI
Eurozone private business growth slowed more than expected this month, despite widespread price cutting, as manufacturing and service industry activity both dwindled, a survey showed on Thur...
Merkel cites euro’s ‘construction flaws’ as economy sputters
German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged euro-area leaders to coordinate more closely on economic policy and repair the “construction flaws” built into the 18- member currency union to overcome...
Inside Business
SOCCER
Greek soccer officials in refereeing probe to face prosecutor on Sept 15
Eleven soccer officials were on Wednesday given until September 15 before they have to face prosecutor Aristidis Koreas, who is investigating allegations that the draws to decide which match...
ATHLETICS
Long jumper Tsatoumas takes Greece´s second silver at European Championships
Greece won its second medal at the European Athletics Championships in Zurich, Switzerland, on Sunday with Louis Tsatoumas coming second in the long jump. Briton Greg Rutherford won the even...
Inside Sports
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
 RECENT NEWS
1. Avramopoulos in US for talks with Hagel on possible Greek role in peace missions
2. Three held on Rhodes over human trafficking accusations
3. Brussels warns Greece over plans to allow construction near Korinos beach
4. Eurozone business growth slows in July, prices fall: PMI
5. Merkel cites euro’s ‘construction flaws’ as economy sputters
6. Second man held over double murder in Mani
more news
Today
This Week
1. Merkel cites euro’s ‘construction flaws’ as economy sputters
2. Second man held over double murder in Mani
3. Eurozone business growth slows in July, prices fall: PMI
4. Brussels warns Greece over plans to allow construction near Korinos beach
5. Three held on Rhodes over human trafficking accusations
6. Avramopoulos in US for talks with Hagel on possible Greek role in peace missions
Today
This Week
1. Carved sphinxes at Ancient Amphipolis tomb will not be removed
2. Canada’s fiscal adjustment has lessons for Greece
3. Treating Amphipolis with care
4. Greece to offer law on restructuring bad loans next month
5. Greece’s recession eases as country nears end to six-year slump
6. Ministry sys ‘no’ to debt collection agencies
   Find us ...
  ... on
Twitter
     ... on Facebook   
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright © 2014, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.