Friday December 19, 2014 Search
Weather | Athens
17o C
10o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
Boroume volunteer group gets food to the needy

By Lina Giannarou

«Saving food -- saving lives” is the motto of nonprofit initiative Boroume (We Can), established in January by Xenia Papastavrou, Alexandros Theodoridis and Alexia Moatsou in order to coordinate the daily donation of surplus food from a variety of sources to orphanages, soup kitchens, nursing homes and other welfare institutions.

“I’ve made a lovely fish soup with vegetables, scorpion fish, ombrine and monkfish for six people. I know it’s not a lot, but I can give it away today. Margarita B.”

This SMS message, which arrived on Papastavrou’s cell phone as I was speaking to her, is the simplest version of what Boroume does on a daily basis. On this particular Sunday, Papastavrou communicated with Margarita B. and told her about a retirement home near her own house that is part of Boroume’s network. Within a few hours, the fish soup was delivered to their door.

Papastavrou, a graduate of the London School of Economics in human resource management, started out helping austerity-hit Greece as a volunteer at the Food Bank. When the idea of creating a network that would bring together catering services and welfare groups began taking shape in her mind, she couldn’t imagine the magnitude of change she would see in the way people responded to acting as a community.

Bakeries, restaurant chains and catering companies joined the Boroume group in droves, often anonymously. More than 500 people from around Greece signed up as volunteers, home cooks and shopkeepers who wanted to do something to help.

Within weeks, tons of fresh food that would normally have been consigned to the trash, from whole loaves of bread to gourmet dishes that were never sold at fancy restaurants, found their way to people in need, at the 400-plus institutions and soup kitchens that make up Boroume’s growing network.

One of the secrets of the group’s success is that it finds welfare groups and food programs in the neighborhood of the associated restaurant, catering business or volunteer cook, cutting out the time-consuming and costly process of having to store and transport the food from one central location.

“This allows us to operate in a number of different locations, with zero cost and fast,” explained Papastavrou.

One of the group’s biggest recent scores was its collaboration with the Association of Athens Hoteliers, which was looking into ways that it could help the needy. Through Boroume, 25 hotels in the Greek capital currently produce 50 meals a week each that are distributed to welfare institutions and soup kitchens.

“They didn’t want to simply donate food that was left over in their restaurants. They wanted to cook specifically for this purpose in order to help institutions in their area,” said Papastavrou. “It is crucial for people in need to receive help in their own neighborhood and not to have to travel distances and stand in queues,” she added.

The chefs and kitchen assistance at the hotels have thrown themselves into the effort wholeheartedly, says Papastavrou. “Like unsung heroes, the guys in the kitchens give it their best, preparing delicious, nourishing food.”

The hotels that have signed up to the program have also proved invaluable to Boroume in terms of the equipment they offer.

“They give away a lot of cooking utensils and appliances that are in mint condition and in storage. Every week we draw up a list of the items needed by various institutions around Athens and e-mail it to the association. It, in turn, informs its members and they then let us know if the items we need are available. We have asked for everything, from curtains to dishwashers, and they have always responded.”

The success of Boroume seems to be growing as it receives new requests every day from ever-larger companies looking to join the cause.

“In the past it would have taken a lot of time and energy to convince some of these businesses to help. Now they themselves call in and ask to participate,” said Papastavrou.

But however fast the list of participants grows, it cannot keep up with the list of people in need. A year ago, the Municipality of Zografou, for example, distributed two meals a week to 70 people. Today it feeds 430 people twice a week, the criterion being people who earn less than 6,000 euros a year. In December last year, the Pendeli food program fed 150 people a week; today it feeds 300.

“A lot of municipalities are asking for our help to collect food to be distributed in schools as well,” said Papastavrou. “The need is just so big.”

To learn more about Boroume, log on to the bilingual Greek-English website at www.boroume.gr.

ekathimerini.com , Wednesday March 28, 2012 (17:32)  
Youngsters’ memories of the anti-landfill blockades
Event to promote awareness of tax issues for foreign residents
Thousands of children journey into the unknown
Slow compensation thwarts fight against antiquity smuggling
El Greco-inspired, metal sculptures in Russia
SAINT PETERSBURG – Standing beneath the 101.52-meter gold-plated dome of the State Museum St Isaac’s Cathedral, Nikos Floros seemed visibly moved. Two works by the Greek artist, each standin...
Documentary traces the musical legacy of the great Nikos Xylouris
For three successive generations, the family of the legendary Cretan singer-songwriter Nikos Xylouris and his brother, the equally famous Antonis Xylouris, known as Psarantonis, have kept th...
Inside Life
Inside Travel
Inside Gastronomy
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
 RECENT NEWS
1. Hollande suggests he and Merkel will move jointly to help Greece
2. Parliament´s ethics panel mulls Haikalis´ bribery claims, peruses video
3. ND rebuffs bribery claims, says alleged mediator was adviser to Kammenos
4. GD´s Kasidiaris charged for recording chat with ex PM aide
5. Independent Greeks leader backs MP´s bribery claims, threatens to release video [Update]
6. Ministry rebuffs reports that Amphipolis skeleton has been identified
more news
Today
This Week
1. Independent Greeks MP Haikalis claims attempted bribery for presidential vote
2. Greek PM Samaras confronts peril putting his Greek transformation to vote
3. Ship with 200 migrants off Pylos towed to Italy after passengers refuse to stop in Greece
4. Gov't spokeswoman says bribery claims 'badly-played charade,' heralds legal action if evidence not produced
5. Former premier Mitsotakis to meet President Papoulias to discuss political upheaval
6. Independent Greeks leader backs MP's bribery claims, threatens to release video [Update]
Today
This Week
1. Juncker warns Greeks against voting 'extreme forces' into power
2. Romanos and the dilemma
3. Samaras summons bond vigilantes with euro exit talk
4. A friendly yet firm message from Pierre Moscovici
5. High stakes
6. Europe's drama in Greece needs final act to avoid tragedy
   Find us ...
  ... on
Twitter
     ... on Facebook   
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright © 2014, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.