CULTURE

Nomads are still finding their way out of the garage

Back here for more shows at a good time, when garage-rock seems to be re-emerging as a popular style on rock’n’roll’s multifaceted front, Swedish act The Nomads, one of Europe’s leading garage-punk bands throughout the 1980s, will be performing two shows at the capital’s An Club this week, on Friday and Saturday. As one of the numerous garage-rock bands that surfaced during the post-punk era of the early 1980s, the Nomads impressed fans with their spirited, raw and usually confrontational delivery of rock’n’roll. Like many peers, most of whom viewed Iggy Pop and his first band, the Stooges, as well as other similar acts of the late 1960s as their mentors, The Nomads attempted to keep rock’n’roll authentic and uncontrived. Along with bands such as The Fuzztones, Dead Moon, The Fleshtones, and the Hoodoo Gurus, the Stockholm-based outfit helped create a stir of activity in rock’s underground scene of the time. Unlike many of their peers, however, The Nomads have stood out from other garage-rock revivalists because of their intensity and wide range of influences that include punk, rockabilly and blues. Still active two decades on, both on record and stage, the veteran act has helped keep the spirit of garage-rock alive, a scene that has recently sprouted a new generation of popular bands, including The Strokes and White Stripes, both of which are currently enjoying particular success. Though Donaldson’s insistence on this novel-sounding instrument inhibited the amount of respect the musician was able to command, the stance ultimately helped distinguish him as a jazzman who approached his craft from a unique vantage point. Donaldson’s position as a prominent figure amid the soul-jazz movement of the 1960s was, in fact, further enhanced when he started to use a Hammond organist instead of the customary pianist in his groups.