CULTURE

Kathimerini edition is displayed in Strasbourg

Good news travels fast, especially at times like these when fear can lurk in a simple postal envelope. We opened up a roll marked Sender: Museum of Greek Children’s Art, Kodrou 9, Plaka. Instead of white powder, out came sun rays, rainbows, striped lambs, a speechless mermaid, colors, and shapes, all the product of children’s imaginations, like a much-needed smile of optimism. These were children’s paintings from competitions held throughout Greece for primary school children, that have been selected by a committee of celebrities and will be used in exhibitions on nature, and the child’s life or family. This year’s theme was Earth and Fire, Air and Water and the children created their own happy world from them. Their authentic material was like an injection of optimism in last Sunday’s edition of Kathimerini, where it appeared under the heading: Children’s paintings: An antidote to terror. I tremble, a teacher told a child’s mother, to think of the day when we set ‘airplanes’ or ‘towers’ as subjects, and what we will see painted by children who were faced with these images of horror. But the little girl with the striped lamb is keeping watch on her world where the windows are not on television but darns from her grandfather’s socks. The mermaid has a boat in the background, not an aircraft carrier, at least for the moment. We heard from Strasbourg, where the Exhibition of Children’s Paintings is on display in the Aubette Room in the main square, from the Museum of Greek Children’s Art and from the press office of the Council of Europe that the page from Sunday’s paper has become a poster dominating the entrance to the exhibition, and has appeared in reports in other newspapers. Enel Hydro approved for CSF quality controls