OPINION

Behind the anxiety

One of the fundamental characteristics of the electoral campaign which will draw to a close Saturday is the attempt – led by most of the pro-government media – to incite old-fashioned partisan passions and fanaticism. Nevertheless, despite concerted efforts to stir up past divisions and to cultivate a climate of intolerance, PASOK has not yet managed to rally its fighting forces. Furthermore, Socialist party voters seem less anxious for the election results. This trend is easily explained if you ask supporters of the ruling party, but it remains paradoxical and unexpected for the pro-government media. It is natural that the supporters of a political party that has been in power for such a long period of time are less keen and anxious than those of the opposition. PASOK voters are backing a tested government which has, inevitably, caused disappointment and been damaged. Its followers are more apologetic than critical. Opposition supporters, on the other hand, are on the offensive and dream of a new and hopeful administration. Voter behavior these days is not influenced by the prejudice and divisiveness of the past. With the exception of a cross section of voters who eye a share in the spoils of victory, the majority of citizens assess their rivals on the basis of objective and less partisan criteria. Besides, the disengagement of political parties from outdated ideological commitments has led to the bankruptcy of partisan mouthpieces in the media. It is obvious that the resurrection of fanaticism and intolerance attempted by the aforementioned segment of the media has little if any impact on the electorate. Media anxiety, passion and fanaticism for a PASOK victory betrays the existence of conflicting interests which can hardly be said to promote the overhaul of our sleaze-ridden political system and the well-being of the people.