OPINION

Illegal players

Many players are involved in the matter of business and political entanglement. Their almost unhindered activity has allowed the formation of unofficial power centers which have undermined the political system, enfeebled democratic institutions and, above all, plunged a considerable part of the Greek economy into the sphere of illegality. The emergence of this situation, combined with a public administration which has been corroded by partisan objectives, has lent Greece a particular character which distinguishes it from its European Union partners and keeps it at the bottom of EU tables. Hence, the country’s political elite can only count on European Union subsidies for its development. Economic analysts rightly point out that, under the present system, Greece will not only come to standstill at some point in the near future – regardless of developments in the international environment – but will also be overtaken by countries which are expected to enter the EU in the next wave of enlargement. Hence, business and political entanglement is not only a phenomenon that occasionally gives rise to politico-economic scandals aimed at domestic consumption at certain unfavorable junctures. It is a state of affairs which has a decisive effect on the course of a country that is part of the strong competitive environment of the eurozone and functions within the overall context of globalization. The question that arises today is: Are the politicians that are directly or indirectly responsible for the creation and the reinforcement of intertwined interests today in a position to fight these interests? And do they really have the willingness and vigor to set up an institutional system which will push economic activity back into the sphere of legality? If the answer is yes, then it will have to be given soon, and in concrete form. The recent developments regarding political and business entanglement have highlighted that things have come to a head. Certain figures have now emerged into the light. The important question, however, is whether the system where these figures draw their strength from will be maintained or destroyed. And the tough challenge for the country’s political elite is that if it desires to inflict a decisive blow on the system, it will first have to eliminate a considerable number of players from its own ranks.