OPINION

Facing an inevitable truth

Panicking is never a good way to deal with a problem and certainly not with a crisis that demands a cool head. The government’s behavior, which in recent weeks has been indecisive and contradictory, proves the point, as this has simply increased uncertainty on international markets and taken a huge toll on the mood of the Greek economy. The attacks against speculators, threats that Greece will turn to the International Monetary Fund if Europe doesn’t step up and the more recent assurances that the IMF would only come into play as a last-ditch measure are scenes that have played across our television screens like a docudrama. Meanwhile, international markets are extremely reluctant to lend any money to Greece and the joint IMF-EU bailout plan is looming all the more prominently as a certainty. So why does the government keep going on and on, when sooner or later it will be forced to adopt those measures that some like to think of as a distant prospect? The government would be better off expending its energy in preparing the public and its officials for the inevitable truth.