OPINION

True globalization

One way to look at things is that the god of Greece, whom we so frequently evoke, caused the volcano in Iceland to erupt in order to cover Europe with the ash that has grounded thousands of flights, and with them the airplane that was supposed to bring our new chaperons from the International Monetary Fund. As far as the currently worshipped god goes, whom we have also managed to make a Greek and a commodity of the state, only the Third Commandment has stood in the way of our believing or assuming that he stepped in to help the people in their time of economic hardship. Either way, even if the IMF supervisors do not make it to Greece in person, there are always the teleconferences through which they can issue their orders to the government of the willing. To draw from T.S. Eliot’s poem «Ash Wednesday,» there is something to be learned from the rapid transformation of Europe into a continent of ash: first, that the boundaries carved by war and man, just or unjust, mean nothing up in the heavens and, secondly, that our planet Earth is too small for us to allow the term «globalization» to mean only the vulgar definition assigned to it by the notorious markets and their tarnished interests – nature (which expresses itself so mightily, though not out of revenge as some self-centered humans like to argue rather ridiculously) is truly global, like hunger, disease and ecological disasters. What this grand incineration of so many man-made mechanisms and systems, and this dramatic change in the day-to-day lives of millions of people also tells us is that our technologically minded society is still a long way away from having the power it boasts. And what do we do about it? A shadow has been cast over Europe and stopped it in its tracks, and our reaction is to assess the damage by the only criterion we know or care about – the money lost.