OPINION

The coalition’s dead end

The country is becoming increasingly cut off from Europe. First came the banks and the capital controls. Then it was the institutions’ turn, with the government behaving toward them in a way unbefitting of a EU country.

We now face the danger of absolute isolation given the current threat of a Schengen exit or the closure of the country’s northern borders. In the face of such danger, the government is doing the only thing it knows how to: going in search of phantoms, excuses and enemies.

After all, it rose to power through the lecture theater and university sit-ins. Managing state affairs, governing and taking part in crucial negotiations turned out to be too heavy a burden.

The situation is growing increasingly complicated and dangerous. Sensible people do not want elections or unexpected developments. At the same time, the deepening worry and belief that the coalition simply cannot handle the country’s fate at this point is being cemented. The dead end is becoming obvious. But this is the administration’s dead end and should under no circumstances become the country’s.