OPINION

Double standards on police officers

No right-minded person would deny that a great number of police officers in Greece work under demanding and often dangerous conditions. But that does not change the fact that more and more police officers succeed in getting themselves a safe, undemanding post in some office or as a bodyguard, where they can then enjoy the easy life in a civil servant-like job. The demand of Greek Police (ELAS) unions that all policemen receive benefits given to those in jobs classified as hazardous is unfair to those in the profession who spend entire days and nights on the streets, putting their lives at risk for the sake of the common good. The instance of a senior conservative official behaving as union leader rather than as a minister has put the New Democracy government in a difficult position. And here lies a paradox. The government’s decisions are made in a collective fashion and Public Order Minister Vyron Polydoras only recently refused to fulfill the fair demands of preschool and primary school teachers for fiscal reasons. So are fiscal constraints no longer a concern for the administration, or is this a case of double standards?