Monday September 15, 2014 Search
Weather | Athens
29o C
20o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
Greek state workers strike against job cuts

Greek doctors, prison staff and other state workers went on strike on Wednesday to protest against public sector firings imposed as part of the country's 240 billion euro international bailout.

The 24-hour strike, which is expected to culminate with a midday rally before parliament, coincided with the start of a visit to Athens by inspectors from the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and European Central Bank - the so-called 'troika' of lenders demanding austerity.

"At a time when the government steps up its attack against workers, our response will be strong," said public sector union ADEDY in a statement on the strike, which has led to hospitals having to draft in emergency staff.

Greek labour unions have fiercely resisted government plans to shrink the 600,000-strong civil service through layoffs or transfers of workers. They fear the measures will further worsen the plight of Greeks struggling through a six-year recession.

The finance and administrative reform ministries filed a lawsuit against the strike and a court ruling was expected later on Wednesday.

While Greece is beginning to emerge from its protracted recession, anti-austerity sentiment remains high in the country, where repeated rounds of spending cuts and tax hikes since its rescue from bankruptcy in 2010 have driven up unemployment and homelessness and eroded living standards.

Last week, Greece suffered brief power outages due to a strike by electricity workers protesting against plans to sell off part of its biggest power producer, Public Power Corp (PPC), to a private competitor in 2015.

The government took legal action and forced the strikers back to work on Saturday. It is eager to avoid major disruption during the summer holiday season as tourism is central to Greece's hopes for economic recovery.

PPC's biggest trade union GENOP-DEH, Greece's private sector union GSEE and the Communist-affiliated trade union PAME will stage a demonstration outside parliament later on Wednesday as lawmakers inside debate a draft bill on the PPC privatization.

"Electricity is a public good, not a commodity to be sold off cheap, and those who do so must be held accountable to society," GSEE said in a statement on Wednesday.

"The fight against the privatization of PPC is a long one and it will not end even after the bill in question is passed."

The troika inspectors, who are in Athens to check on Greece's progress under the bailout program, are due to meet newly-appointed Finance Minister Gikas Hardouvelis on Thursday. [Reuters]

ekathimerini.com , Wednesday Jul 9, 2014 (12:23)  
Central Athens traffic restrictions back in force on Monday
Soccer fan clinically dead after clashes on Crete
Tsipras pledges major debt haircut and hikes in wages and pensions
Greek coalition concerned troika inspection may drag on
ANALYSIS
OMT may be key to full market access
The upgrade of Greeces credit rating by Standard & Poors, the likely attainment of the fiscal target, signs of economic recovery and the ECBs recent policy actions may further compress bo...
US real estate companies flock to Greece
The entry of new foreign investors flirting with Greek real estate looks set to be strengthened by the possible opening of another major US realtors office in Greece, following reports that...
Inside Business
WATER POLO
Greece wins womens U19 Europeans in water polo
Greece won the womens European Under-19 Championship in Italy beating the host in Sundays final, for what was the countrys second gold medal in the competitions history. The Greek teenag...
SOCCER
Veria alone on Super League summit
Olympiakos appeared in fine shape ahead of its Champions League premiere against Atletico Madrid on Tuesday, beating visiting OFI 3-0 on Saturday, but Macedonian minnows Veria are those that...
Inside Sports
COMMENTARY
Greece on standby
Greece is nervous and stagnating. Europe too is nervous, yet in motion. France is jolting along: President Francois Hollande is trying to deflect attention from the unpleasant situation at h...
EDITORIAL
Bias in the judiciary
There was a time when the Greek justice system was shackled to the whims of political parties as appointments and often decisions were dictated by central party headquarters. Today, the judi...
Inside Comment
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
RECENT NEWS
1. Central Athens traffic restrictions back in force on Monday
2. Greece wins womens U19 Europeans in water polo
3. Veria alone on Super League summit
4. Soccer fan clinically dead after clashes on Crete
5. OMT may be key to full market access
6. US real estate companies flock to Greece
more news
Today
This Week
1. Central Athens traffic restrictions back in force on Monday
2. US real estate companies flock to Greece
3. Ship equipment makers strike deals with foreign shipyards
4. Hoteliers fear more trouble from Russia
5. OMT may be key to full market access
6. Agenda
Today
This Week
1. A Greek God
2. Avramopoulos appointed Commissioner for Migration and Home Affairs
3. Pavlos Fyssas murder trial expected to start before the end of the year
4. EU bank tests may miss trillion dollar risk, study finds
5. Greece on standby
6. SYRIZA spokesman suggests gov't sought to stop NERIT airing Tsipras speech live
Find us ...
... on
Twitter
... on Facebook
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright 2014, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.