Greek garbage collectors reject compromise as trash piles up

NEWS

Greece's municipal garbage collectors on Tuesday rejected a government compromise offer and decided to continue an 11-day protest that has left mounds of festering refuse piled up across Athens amid high temperatures during the key summer tourism season.

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NEWS Cyprus

UN conference on Cyprus gets under way on Wednesday

United Nations envoy Espen Barth Eide said on Tuesday that there are no guarantees of success at today’s Cyprus Conference in the Swiss resort of Crans-Montana, but insisted that it remains an opportunity for a breakthrough “as there is an awareness that there is no time like the present.”

NEWS Taxation

Greeks work 203 days out of the year to pay taxes

Greeks will work an average of 203 days this year to pay taxes to the state and social insurance contributions, according to research conducted by the Dragoumis Center for Liberal Studies (KEFIM) to raise awareness about tax freedom day – the first day of the year in which a country has theoretically earned enough income to pay its taxes.

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BUSINESS Economy

Tens of local authorities omit figures

EVGENIA TZORTZI

As many as 137 municipal authorities, which correspond to 42 percent of all local authorities and 31 percent of the country’s population, have not published their ratified financial reports for 2015, according to a study by the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Review (IOBE) published on Tuesday.

BUSINESS Privatizations

OLTH investors to upgrade Thessaloniki port

ILIAS BELLOS

The contractual obligation for investing 180 million euros in Thessaloniki port should be rapidly implemented, the chief executive officer of CMA CGM subsidiary Terminal Link, Boris Wenzel, and the managing director of DIEP, Alexander von Mellenthin, promised in their first formal joint appearance in Greece on Tuesday.

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COMMENT Society

The trash heap phenomenon

PANTELIS BOUKALAS

The sudden yet inevitable appearance of stinking heaps of trash in Greece’s cities, and in Athens and Thessaloniki in particular (which are especially vulnerable), is not some bizarre geological phenomenon.

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