Monday October 20, 2014 Search
Weather | Athens
24o C
16o C
News
Business
Comment
Life
Sports
Community
Survival Guide
Greek Edition
For SYRIZA and Tsipras, youth is not enough to unseat ‘aged powers’

By Nick Malkoutzis

Alexis Tsipras told delegates at SYRIZA's founding congress on Wednesday that it is time for the leftists to rid Greece of its “aged powers,” namely New Democracy and PASOK. But to do so, SYRIZA can’t rely just on being younger than them.

SYRIZA was founded as the Coalition of the Radical Left in 2004 thanks to a cooperation between several leftist parties, most notably Synaspismos. As is to be expected of youth, SYRIZA spent its formative years not really knowing what it wanted to be – a sounding board for leftist intellectuals, a springboard for political activists or a launch pad for the left to come to power. SYRIZA members had this existential question answered for them last summer thanks to the party's impressive showing in the June elections, when it garnered almost 27 percent of the vote and won 72 seats in Parliament.

Since then Tsipras, just 38, has been on a mission to mould SYRIZA into a party of government rather than a collection of leftist factions happy with life on the opposition benches. The conference is due to end with almost all the factions voting themselves into oblivion and SYRIZA becoming a single unit. Over the last year, though, Tsipras's has been far from a steady hand at the helm. He was veered from an anti-austerity platform last summer to the attempt at reconciliation with Greece's lenders and center ground voters earlier this year. He toned down his rhetoric after the elections, then ramped it up as Cyprus was being bailed out, before settling for a holding pattern ahead of this week's congress.

There have been times when his strategy has paid off and opinion polls showed SYRIZA edging ahead, but these bursts from the pack containing the “oldies” have always been short-lived. Tsipras and his party have failed to turn Greek society's undoubted dissatisfaction into any great advantage. A Public Issue survey published on Wednesday night showed SYRIZA still neck-and-neck with New Democracy, with support for the two parties running at 28.5 percent for the conservatives and 27.5 percent for the leftists. Tsipras has been unable to outpace Samaras in the popularity stakes as well. The prime minister has a positive rating of 39 percent, against 36 for the SYRIZA chief. Since last June’s elections, Tsipras’s popularity has been up and down, reaching a peak of 44 percent March and May but also falling to a low of 36 percent in April and this month. He has not yet gained voters’ lasting trust.

Perhaps most worryingly of all for Tsipras, though, the survey underlines that SYRIZA has failed so far to convince the Greek public it can address the country’s problems more effectively than the government. Only 16 percent of respondents this month said they were satisfied with the coalition’s approach. A government which inspires such feeble confidence in its people should be easy prey for an opposition on the rise. That’s unless voters have even less faith in the alternative choice. The Public Issue poll indicates that just 14 percent of Greeks believe SYRIZA is tackling issues in the right way.

It would, however, be churlish to expect SYRIZA and Tsipras to have become the finished article in just 12 months. It is worth remembering that he led the party to a showing of just 4.6 percent in the national elections less than four years ago. Tsipras and his party have traveled a long way in the last few years but it is not clear that SYRIZA's younger legs will help carry it over the finish line.

SYRIZA appears to have hit a ceiling in terms of the support it can gain by opposing the EU-IMF memorandum. It now needs to balance its opposition to the bailout with policies that will convince center ground voters it won’t make Greece’s terrible situation even worse, that it deserves a chance to govern. The party jumped the gun in March when it celebrated the Cypriot Parliament's decision to reject a bailout deal, only for Nicosia to accept an equally painful option in even worse circumstances a few days later.

Repeated talk of forming a southern European alliance has yielded few results. The sad truth is that the only time the periphery has flexed any muscle was at an EU summit just over a year ago when Italy's Mario Monti, backed by Spain, convinced Angela Merkel to allow direct bank recapitalization and relax bailout conditions. Since then, Germany and its eurozone allies have gradually been undoing everything that was agreed that night.

Last month, Tsipras presented a set of proposals on welfare measures that was truly admirable. It included plans to write off the debt owed by families who live below the poverty line and giving families who have no breadwinner a moratorium from taxes. He declined, though, to say how much this would cost and where he would find the money from. By presenting proposals that are not costed at this stage of the crisis, SYRIZA does nothing to convince voters it is serious about governing.

One of the other suggestions put forward by Tsipras was to create a housing program along the lines of Minha Casa, Minha Vida (My Home, My Life) launched by former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in 2009. It is perplexing that SYRIZA would consider this an appropriate use of taxpayers' money at the moment, given that the home ownership rate in Greece is one of the highest in the world at more than 80 percent and there are more than 400,000 unsold properties.

Nevertheless, Tsipras's focus on the social impact of the crisis is refreshing – it is an aspect that is often overlooked or brushed aside in the rush to meet fiscal targets. The obsession with goals, the focus on numbers and the never-ending cycle of projections often obscure the people lingering in the background of all this, the ones who bear the impact when the numbers are crunched. Greece needs someone to think of them, to act and legislate on their behalf.

SYRIZA is correct to pursue the issue of corruption between the public and private sector, which the government repeatedly dismisses in favour of focusing attention exclusively on graft within the civil service. The leftists are also right to highlight the government's hypocrisy over its handling of the public administration, underlining that New Democracy and PASOK must accept their share of the blame for destroying it from within.

Recently, Tsipras suggested Greece could save 25 billion euros by asking the troika for a four-year moratorium on interest repayments and a debt reduction. It may be a wholly unattainable goal but given Greece’s appalling economic situation, an earnest discussion over how its lenders can help lift it out of the mire has to begin.

None of this, though, is enough. To move on to the next stage of its political development, SYRIZA has to start being defined by what it stands for rather than what it stands against. It must overcome the tendency to talk to itself, so prevalent in the Greek left, and communicate with a wider section of society. It has to provide a vision of Greece's future that consists of more than playing hardball with its lenders. It needs credible policies on reshaping the economy and the public administration, and a clear commitment to ditching the compromised, clientelistic practices of the past, to which the left was no stranger. It is no longer good enough for each criticism of SYRIZA and its leader to be rebuffed by the claim that they are not as bad as the politicians and parties that have been running the country for the last few decades. This cannot be the response of a party that is truly committed to being different, to wanting to shake up established practices. Greece needs better than this. The time to truly judge Tsipras and his party will be in the coming months, when we will found out if the “aged powers” have really had their day because a smarter, fairer and more capable – not just younger – alternative is ready to take over.

[Kathimerini English Edition]

ekathimerini.com , Friday Jul 12, 2013 (12:42)  
Greece’s closed society is central to its current malaise
Between West and East
A tough test for new rectors
Greek crisis redux? Not exactly
Turkish vessel enters Cypriot Exclusive Economic Zone
A Turkish research vessel entered Greece’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) on Monday morning, according to the government in Nicosia. The Barbaros, accompanied by two support vessels, entered ...
Samaras to visit Cyprus on November 7, ahead of Egypt talks
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras is to make an official visit to Cyprus on November 7, it has been announced. According to Cypriot government spokesman Nicos Christodoulides, the meeting is ta...
Inside News
Greek toy retailer Jumbo lifts Q1 sales 11 percent
Leading Greek toy retailer Jumbo reported an 11 percent increase in sales in its first quarter to Sept. 30, citing robust growth in Bulgaria and Cyprus. Jumbo, which operates 53 stores in Gr...
Greece must stick to reforms, says Schaeuble
German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaueble has to support or oppose Greek plans to exit the country's bailout at the end of the year, focusing instead on the country's need to continue refor...
Inside Business
BASKETBALL
Reds lose to Nea Kifissia, search for new coach
Nea Kifissia recorded the biggest win of its short history in the top flight defeating Olympiakos 68-67 on Sunday, in a Basket League weekend marred by the abandonment of the Thessaloniki de...
SOCCER
OFI stuns Panathinaikos, Mitroglou hits twice
OFI Crete produced the upset of the week in Greek soccer beating Panathinaikos in Athens for only the second time in its history on Sunday, while PAOK stayed on top beating Atromitos at home...
Inside Sports
SPONSORED LINK: FinanzNachrichten.de
SPONSORED LINK: BestPrice.gr
 RECENT NEWS
1. Greek toy retailer Jumbo lifts Q1 sales 11 percent
2. Turkish vessel enters Cypriot Exclusive Economic Zone
3. Samaras to visit Cyprus on November 7, ahead of Egypt talks
4. Greece must stick to reforms, says Schaeuble
5. European leaders pivot back to debt crisis after wake-up call
6. Bakers encircle Thessaloniki´s White Tower with giant ´koulouri´
more news
Today
This Week
1. Bakers encircle Thessaloniki's White Tower with giant 'koulouri'
2. Hardouvelis does not see 'big surprises' in ECB stress tests
3. European leaders pivot back to debt crisis after wake-up call
4. Greece must stick to reforms, says Schaeuble
5. Samaras to visit Cyprus on November 7, ahead of Egypt talks
6. Turkish vessel enters Cypriot Exclusive Economic Zone
Today
This Week
1. Possible third figure in Amphipolis mosaic may be uncovered shortly
2. Less haste, more focus
3. Greece to contribute 1 mln towards Gaza reconstruction
4. Greece nearing bailout exit, says gov't spokesperson after IMF talks
5. Istanbul skyscraper casts shadow over Greece's banking ambitions
6. Coalition shooting itself in the foot
   Find us ...
  ... on
Twitter
     ... on Facebook   
About us  |  Subscriptions  |  Advertising  |  Contact us  |  Athens Plus  |  RSS  |   
Copyright © 2014, H KAΘHMEPINH All Rights Reserved.