CULTURE

Artists tackle thorny issues in ‘In Flux’

artists-tackle-thorny-issues-in-in-flux

Inspired by current political and economic developments, works by a group of European artists are being showcased in an exhibition titled “In Flux,” in the town of Elefsina, just outside Athens.

The construction of national identity, the immigration and refugee issues, the stormy relationship between East and West, the collapse of institutions, as well as moments of protest and resistance – people today are more familiar than ever with the main topics the exhibition touches upon.

Presented by the 2015 Aeschylia festival and Eleusis 2021, the organization campaigning for the Attica town to be European Capital of Culture six years from now, the exhibition is running at the Leonidas Kanellopoulos Community Center on Elefsina Beach to October 9.

Born between 1967 and 1985, the artists represent the new generation of international artists, while many have represented their countries at the Venice Biennale.

Included among this select set is the Georgian art collective Bouillon Group, which has been active since 2008, Greek-Armenian artist Aikaterini Gegisian, who recently displayed her work in the Armenian pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale, and Dutch photographer Henk Wildschut, whose most recent work, “Shelter,” has picked up numerous awards, with its unique portrayal of the daily lives of refugees in Greece, the Netherlands, Italy, Malta and Spain, as well as Emine Gozde Sevim (Turkey), Ahmet Ogut (Turkey), Sergiy Lebedynsky & Vlad Krasnoshchok (Ukraine), Emeric Lhuisset (France) and Thomas Mailaender (France).

The exhibit is curated by Shoair Mavlian, assistant curator at Tate Modern in London, who also specializes in photography. Recently, she co-organized “Conflict, Time, Photography,” a large exhibition held to mark the centenary of the First World War.

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Info: “In Flux,” Kanellopoulos Community Center, 37 Dragoumi, Elefsina Beach. Open Tuesdays-Sundays from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 6-9.30 p.m. Free entrance. For further information, call 210.556.5613.