OPINION

We need self-confidence, not a toxic attitude

we-need-self-confidence-not-a-toxic-attitude

Greece moves on. It matures and searches for its way. In a global tsunami of anti-systemic politics, it made a four-year commitment against the tide in 2019.

Unfortunately, there then came the coronavirus pandemic, which froze all initiatives and took up all the energy of the state and the government. Things would be very different if Greece had continued, unimpeded, along its growth trajectory. A bigger pie always provides leeway for reform and complaints are far fewer.

At the same time, a new generation has taken the helm. This was also a conscious choice by Greek society that hurt some. But history moves on and not everyone is guaranteed a role. The stage can fit only a limited number of stars.

Still, there should be space for different viewpoints, as well as the forbearance to listen to these viewpoints and, if necessary, discard them. Especially as regards the big challenges facing the country. And it would be better if these debates took place within the relevant institutions.

The Kolonaki Square cafés and government buildings are often incubators of wild ideas and theories. I’ve been trying for years to understand if there’s something in the water in central Athens that is to blame, or if it is something else. Whatever it is, it is toxic and it afflicts the customers and inhabitants of these places, irrespective of political party or background. Strange!

The ruling conservatives have long suffered from inflated egos, drama and personal feuds without the slightest political content. But history can only be repeated as farce. We need immense reserves of stupidity and insecurity to go through the repetition. I think there are no such reserves and that, most importantly, Greek society will not allow such behavior. It wants to move forward, not backward.

So, let’s move on. With a bit more self-assurance and a bit less toxicity, we may even succeed.