VIDEO

Greece’s 1821 and America: A lecture by historian Alexander Kitroeff

greece-s-1821-and-america-a-lecture-by-historian-alexander-kitroeff

The Consulate General of Greece in Boston and College Year in Athens co-hosted a celebratory lecture commemorating the bicentennial of the Greek War of Independence. 

The lecture, organized on March 17, was presented under the auspices of the Embassy of Greece in Washington. Dr Alexander Kitroeff, Professor of History at Haverford College and a Member of CYA’s Academic Advisory Roundtable, discussed the American philhellenic movement during the Greek Revolution. 

The wave of philhellenism that swept through the United States with the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence in 1821 included the establishment of “Greek committees” in Boston, New York and Philadelphia and the arrival of several American volunteers in Greece among whom was Bostonian Samuel Gridley Howe. 

What facilitated the emergence of philhellenism was the growing American fascination with Classical Greece that was expressed through the growth of Greek Revival architecture and an interest in Greece itself and the first visits there by Americans, Edward Everett from Massachusetts and Nicholas Biddle from Pennsylvania. 

What was also remarkable was the growing interest in the Greek struggle for freedom throughout the United States during the 1820s. 

The presentation offered an overall picture of the wide parameters of American philhellenism and explored the reasons for its depth and breadth during this period. 

Greece’s Ambassador in the USA, H.E. Alexandra Papadopoulou offered remarks and wrapped up the event. 

The ambassador was introduced by the Consul General of Greece in Boston, Stratos Efthymiou. 

The President of the CYA, Alexis Phylactopoulos introduced Dr Kitroeff and coordinated the discussion.