HUMAN RIGHTS



Dimitri Tsafendas pictured at Pretoria Maximum Security Prison in 1976. The picture was taken by a police agent who interviewed Tsafendas pretending to be a journalist. [Courtesy of Gordon Winter]
DIMITRI TSAFENDAS

Last Saturday in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique, a memorial service was held for a man who died 22 years ago and who, when he lived, was forgotten or, at best, remembered as insane and insignificant.


Ben Schumaker, who runs Memory Project, an art nonprofit, at his home office in Middleton, Wis., a suburb of Madison, on Sept. 23, 2021. Among vulnerable Afghans left behind after the U.S. withdrawal last month were thousands of people who worked for small nonprofits. [Narayan Mahon/The New York Times]
THE NEW YORK TIMES

Roya was the face of the modern young Afghan woman. As leader of a girls’ club funded by the US government, she gave her troops a script for their lives that their mothers could not pursue: They were just as powerful as boys in their ability to change their communities, she taught them.




visibly-proud
ATHENS PRIDE

Athens Pride is a celebration of visibility. It is a public recognition of human rights and equality.